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Kawasaki Z900 the limited edition paint scheme has launched by Kawasaki in INDIA. The estimated price of the bike is 7.68 lakh, The new edition offers a two new colors  I.e Black and Green.

While the Japanese producer didn’t say the correct numbers this variation will be accessible in, we trust this is companies planning to gage the market reaction. On the off chance that this variation figures out how to get great numbers, Kawasaki may influence it to some portion of the standard shading choices. The organization mentioned in the discharge about its aim to assess the shading choices relying upon the client’s reaction.

Kawasaki claims that other than the new the expansion of this new dark red paint scheme, there has been a couple of decals changes that improve the general interest. The Triumph Street Triple 765 and the Ducati Monster 797 adversary has possessed the capacity to locate a not too bad fan following in India. Yet, regardless it does not have the quality and the brand esteem that the Z800 conveyed.

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Sexy Taiwan mini electric motorcycle is a sight to see with 9 kWh LIPO Battery, CNC machined aluminum frame, 13-inch wheels, flawlessly made carbon parts and speedster electric motor performance up to 130 kph

Controller: Mobipus ( not confirmed )
Battery: 9kWh battery (88.2V/ 120Ah) LiPo (probably A123 – not confirmed)
Range: above 150km per charge.
Custom motor: Made RCE Power. Max performance to be determined
Wheels:13″
Top speed: 130kph (will be limited at 110kph)
Frame material: State of the art CNC’d aluminum and carbon-fiber
Est. production: 2019

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Watch the exclusive launch event for the new Bonneville Speedmaster, Bonneville Bobber Black & the Triumph Factory Experience, a landmark moment for Triumph and Triumph fans with legendary Triumph racers and motorcycles including Steve McQueen’s original Great Escape jump bike.

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IN THE CUSTOM WORLD, there are few more challenging builds than designing a motorcycle around a car engine. They’re heavy and torque focused, and trying to physically fit one into a production bike frame is easier said than done.

But what if your starting point is a car engine and you build everything around it? That’s what New Zealander Marcel van Hooijdonk did to create this incredible ‘Madboxer’ custom.

The Madboxer, as good a name as any for this machine, has been ‘in the build’ for over five years. A toolmaker by trade, Marcel is more than a dab hand behind a set of tools, so when a friend sent him an email with a photo issuing a challenge, he leapt at the chance to put his skills towards something a little different.

“It all started off as a bit of a challenge from a mate in Aussie, Harry, who came across an artist’s impression of a Subaru-powered motorcycle concept—with the comment “something for you to knock up in the shed, mate,” says Marcel.

The car engine was obviously the key to this build, and Marcel had a few options to choose from. The most readily available Subaru engine in NZ is the long-lived EJ series, with capacities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 liters, and found in most Subarus since 1989.

Marcel passed over the ever-popular 2-liter mill, and instead went with a turbocharged EJ25 out of a second generation WRX.

To start the project off, Marcel checked to see if it was even possible to make the Madboxer a reality.

“I got a motor case and some tires, spaced it out, stepped back and grabbed a beer,” he says. After eyeballing it and putting together the mental plan on just how to proceed, the decision was made. “Yes, it’s doable.”

Now committed, Marcel had to lay the groundwork for his build with some serious screen time. Like most serious builders, he started with a computer, put together a CAD drawing, and got signoff from the regulatory body that covers all modified vehicles in New Zealand—the Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association (LVVTA).

“Once I had the motor block and wheels in place I started in AutoCAD, making drawings of the center steer hub, swing arms and the main chassis sides, he says. The drawings were also used for programming the CNC milling center and lathe, which carved out the individual pieces of the bike ready for assembly.

It wasn’t a straightforward job however, and took a few tries to get everything just right. Marcel also had to work out a steering system that met with the approval of the certification panel.

The bike slowly took shape, with a Kawasaki fuel tank, wheels sourced off the NZ eBay equivalent TradeMe, and a smaller twin-turbo unit from a Subaru Legacy replacing the big WRX turbo.

The result is an engine that runs very smoothly, even though it has no real flywheel as such. Marcel opted for a modified Japanese 2-speed automatic transmission, using a chain drive to get power to the rear wheel.

Like other “automatic” motorcycles, there’s no gear lever on the foot pegs—just a button on the handlebars to change gears. Braking is just like a scooter, with a bar-mounted lever for the Buell-sourced brakes.

After all the engineering work, it would be a shame if Madboxer became a trailer queen. But thankfully Marcel fought it out with the LVVTA certifiers and won the day.

“Being able to ride it was the aim right from the get-go,” Marcel explains. “So that did impact on the final design. The system here in NZ is not too bad; you forward your design at the beginning and a panel goes over it. Once you have approval you can start, but with inspections along the way.”

“You always think of something you would like to change, which has to then go back to the panel. At times it’s hair pulling—but now it’s all done and 100 per cent road legal, I must say it wasn’t too bad.”

The Madboxer is a thing of strange beauty. Tipping the scales at 313.5kg, it’s heavy by motorbike standards—but with a boxer engine, the bike holds the majority of its weight down low in the chassis.

With torque levels most bikes can only dream of, Madboxer is sure to fly down the road when ridden. And that’s just what Marcel plans for its future.

Words Mathieu Day-Gillett of Bike Rider Magazine | Images Lindsay Gibb

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YouTuber ‘Ride with Rahul’ is back with another superstar product in his ride review video. This time, it’s none other than Ducati SuperSport S, recently launched in India for INR 13.39 lakh. Rahul got the bike in Red and felt amazed from the very beginning, praising the position as being perfectly balanced between performance and touring.

He further explains how wider seat makes him feel like sitting higher than his usual 810mm high 390 Duke (even though SuperSport has 810mm seat height). As 80% of the power comes at just 3000 rpm, SuperSport S comes out as a perfect option for everyday riding.

Excessively soft seats are not that good for long rides and thus, SuperSport brings balance between the hard and soft side for perfect long ride experience. Movable front windscreen makes it one great option as one could adjust the same as per daily driving and highway needs.

The best part for SuperSport was its everyday use and their conversation even claims that occasional weekend trips would be a delight on Ducati SuperSport. The motorcycle comes with Ducati’s single sided swing-arm that even seems away from 959 Panigale.

Instrument console on the motorcycle is even mind blowing as one get all details regarding engine health, fuel and all other daily need values like odometer, trip-meter and tachometer. Driving modes, traction control and many other electronic features like quick shifter makes SuperSport S the most effective bike for its price.

Ducati SuperSport S is powered by a 937 cc, twin cylinder engine producing 110 HP at 9000 rpm and 96.7 Nm at 6500 rpm. Buyers get Brembo brakes, Ohlins fully adjustable suspension and just 210 kg of wet weight on Ducati SuperSport S. It seems to be a perfect package for those who wish to join Ducati for their quality and practicality in everyday riding.

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In this one, we check out a video of a dirt dragger that has the intensity turned up to 11. If you thought that seeing a Hayabusa in action on concrete was impressive, wait until you see this thing trying to conquer the dirt as it wraps up and spits out wake of brown, screaming as loud as possible while the driver sways back and forth, making his way down the track and through the finish line.

We have to say that this motorcycle is a pure joy for all the senses as it hits the dirt with a vengeance, really making its presence felt as this rider has to have balls of steel to be able to make this thing work all the way down the track.

Check out the video down below that will put you on the scene of the action, giving you a perfect perspective to bear witness to this incredible two-wheeled freak as it plants down hard and gets to business. When it comes time to get to racing, it really seems like this thing is all work and no play.

If you like this story don’t forget to Follow Us on Facebook and stay updated for our next awesome story.

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There ain’t no doubt that Indian Motorcycle Company built some amazingly beautiful motorcycles in its day, eh?

I mean, take a look at the 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle in the video thumbnail below.

Take in how beat up, dusty and rusty, and ugly it is. Now, ask yourself if it is a beautiful motorcycle.

The answer, of course, is that it is a downright gorgeous motorcycle no matter how neglected it had been over the decades.

And the most epic thing about this beautiful yet ugly American motorcycle is that it had sat unstarted for 40 friggin years straight until it was cold started on this video. How cool is that? Yeah, that is Indian Chief cool for sure!

Click play and be blown away by the sound, smoke, and fury of this old old motorcycle!

If you like this story don’t forget to Follow Us on Facebook and stay updated for our next awesome story.

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The Riding Assist-e is the latest step in Honda’s quest to make motorcycling more accessible to everyone. (Credit: Honda / NewAtlas.com)

Honda will debut a fascinating new motorcycle built specifically to help learner motorcyclists coming to grips with two wheels for the first time. The bike will be one of the highlights on Honda’s stand at the forthcoming 45th Tokyo Motor Show, which runs from October 27 to November 5.

Dubbed the Honda Riding Assist-e, the bike is an electric vehicle with a low center-of-gravity and a very low seat height, but its most interesting capability is a self-balancing technology.

For those who ride a motorcycle already, the concept of your motorcycle deciding how far you can lean it over might seem counter productive. But Honda’s balancing technology, which is apparently derived from its humanoid robot research, only balances the bike at “very low speeds” – something that seems to make perfect sense.

Few details have been released at this stage and it’s unlikely we’ll know anything more until the bike is shown to the media on October 25, but here’s hoping that Honda will do more than just show the bike and ask us to suspend disbelief.

From the imagery that has been released, the gyroscopic self-balancing device appears to be located between the rider’s thighs, and though it is likely that power is delivered via an electric hub motor, the single-sided swing-arm seems disproportionately large, suggesting there may be additional Honda engineering magic contained therein.

Similarly, the trellis frame appears to be far more robust than one would expect of a low powered learner bike.

A close look at the instrument panel in the Honda-supplied images also suggests the bike will be configurable for different levels of newbies – it is pictured displaying “Mode 4”, so there will be at least four modes. The number of degrees of lean is also displayed on the dash, perhaps indicating the bike can be configured to intervene at a particular lean angle and deactivate at a particular speed.

All said, the unconventional appearance of the bike conveys it isn’t your normal learner bike, and that promises something quite special when the Honda name is involved.

Let’s hope so.

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Yamaha R15 is a head turner with sharp design, eye popping performance and colorful official shades. A-Wraps went into another direction and raised the style quotient of R15 V2.0 through their Matte Black body wrap, further enhanced through the use of Matte Chrome Red highlights all over its body. Side fairing of R15 comes with Deltabox branding, YZF-R15 moniker and white finished logos for Michelin, NGK, Motul, Nissin, Monster and others.

They have kept all fuel logos intact but finished the same in Red for better contrast. Special Edition is seen written on both the sides of pillion seat fairing. Apart from changing the basic theme, halogen headlights from the motorcycle makes way for projector headlights.

Front visor now comes completely wrapped in Matt Black. R15 is powered by 149cc, single cylinder engine producing 16.8 BHP and 15 Nm of torque. R15 is preparing for its third generation as the same is now officially available in many South Asian markets.

Key Specifications of Yamaha R15 V2

Displacement 149.8 cc
Maximum Power 16.8 Bhp @ 8500 rpm
Maximum Torque 15 Nm @ 7500 rpm
No. of Cylinders 1
No. of Gears 6
Seat Height 800 mm
Ground Clearance 160 mm
Kerb/Wet Weight 136 kg
Fuel Tank Capacity 12 litres
Top Speed 131 kmph

Complete Specifications of Yamaha R15 V2

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By Tom White

There is little doubt that 1981 was an interesting year for Honda. The manufacturer went all Star Wars on its cosmetics, plus water-cooled the CR125 and CR250, introduced the ill-fated CR450 and unveiled the stupidest front number plate in motocross history. Still, the 1981 CR250 tried to bring exotic works technology to the production line. It was the first-ever, water-cooled, 250cc production bike. Borrowing works technology, the 1981 CR250 shared the works bike’s long-stroke engine design, center port exhaust, semi-double-cradle frame and Pro-Link single-shock suspension. Although Honda wasn’t the first to put a single-shock system on a production bike, the Pro-Link setup proved to be a precursor for all the linkage designs in use today.

In 1981 Honda broke away from Showa to outfit the CR250 with Kayaba components. Honda wasn’t ready to go to disc brakes in 1981, but it did equip the CR250 with a double-leading-shoe front drum that worked very well. There were problems, though. The frames had a tendency to break, the clutch slipped, the head pipe hung below the frame and the transmission popped out of third gear constantly. Even worse, the 1981 CR250 weighed a ton, and the wing-like front number plate, designed to get more air to the two small radiators, was so ugly that nobody ever raced with it.

THE ODDITY EXTRAPOLATION

The 1981 Honda CR250 is collectible only because of its unique place in history. Not a great bike by any stretch of the imagination, it is memorable for its ground-breaking technology and ugly aesthetics. Even oddities can have a following, which is why collector bikes must have the original wing-style front number plate, along with the double-leading-shoe front brake and remote reservoir, four-click adjustable shock.

The Japanese domestic version did not have the wing-like front number plate, but then none of the American models had them once the buyers got the bike home. The domestic Japanese model (shown above) had a forward facing, but very small front number plate (with the same wire screen below it as the American model).

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